Arsene Wenger praises ‘relentless’ Arsenal after Newcastle win

Arsene Wenger praised the “relentless effort” of his side as they secured a stoppage-time win over Newcastle.

The Gunners came from behind to win their fourth Premier League game in a row when

Thomas Vermaelen converted Theo Walcott’s late cross.


Arsene Wenger

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Wenger said: “What beat them was our relentless effort to win. In the end, we won it.

“I never thought we wouldn’t win. I said to my assistant that we needed one more attack and we would score.”

Continue reading the main story

Great teams score late goals

Newcastle boss Alan Pardew

Arsenal were 10 points behind rivals Tottenham in the race for third place

before their meeting last month,

but the Gunners are now only a point behind after extending their run of victories and look favourites to secure a Champions League spot.

Wenger’s side conceded first at the Emirates on Monday for the fourth consecutive match when Hatem Ben Arfa drilled in at the near post, but Robin van Persie replied inside a minute with his 44th goal in his last 45 Premier League appearances, before Vermaelen grabbed the late winner.

“This was a game of absolute commitment on both sides,” Wenger said.

“Newcastle are a good team and it needed something special to beat them.

LAST-GASP GUNNERS WINNERS

11 February: 2-1 Sunderland (A)

Thierry Henry (90th minute)

3 March: 2-1 Liverpool (A)

Robin van Persie (93rd minute)

12 March: 2-1 Newcastle (H)

Thomas Vermaelen (95th minute)

“Newcastle tried to slow us down but we get that many times. We got five minutes extra time and that allowed us to win the game.

“We won in the last minute against Sunderland, Liverpool and now Newcastle. That shows we have absolute commitment.

“They are refusing to lose. That’s fantastic. The team has to be credited for an excellent performance again.”

Walcott – who was impressive throughout – believes his side can catch Tottenham to take third spot.

“Tottenham have got to be watching over their shoulders now,” Walcott said.

“With the squad of players we’ve got – and we’ve got a lot of players coming back to fitness now – we believe that we can go much further.

“It’s been an up and down season, but it’s the way you finish, and that’s the most important thing.”


Alan Pardew

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Newcastle boss Alan Pardew felt his side deserved a point but called for his players to not let the manner of defeat derail their own push for European football.

The Magpies are five points behind fifth-placed Chelsea with 10 games left of the season.

“It’s tough to take,” Pardew said.

“We came up against a side that are bang in form and whose confidence is high. We restricted them for long periods of the game, and they make it very difficult.

“It’s really sickening for us. Great teams score late goals. Overall tonight I though we deserved a point.

“We’ve got a tough game against Norwich on Saturday and we need to win, so we need to make sure we patch ourselves up.”

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/17348252

Twitter Snaps Up Engineers From Blog Player Posterous

Twitter has agreed to acquire blogging platform Posterous.

Offering services for both businesses and Joe Blogger, Posterous has long fought for a place at the blogging platform table — battling with giants such as WordPress, Google’s Blogger, TypePad, and Tumblr — and judging from Twitter’s announcement of the deal, that fight is now over.

Apparently, Twitter has acquired Posterous solely for its talent.

In a blog post, the company said it will soon provide “clear instructions” for users who want to back up their content or move from Posterous to another blogging service. And then it put the spotlight on the 36 employees at Posterous. “Posterous engineers, product managers and others will join our teams working on several key initiatives that will make Twitter even better,” read the blog post from Twitter. “We’re always looking for talented people who have the passion and personality to join Twitter.”

In late November, Twitter bought Whisper Systems, founded by internet security guru Moxie Marlinspike, and this too was acquiring talent. Whisper’s staff also included well-known roboticist Stuart Anderson.

Sachin Argawal, Posterous’ CEO and founder, spent six years at Apple building the video-editing software Final Cut. Chief product officer Brian Frank has held product management positions at giants such as Adobe, Intel and Palm. Vice president of engineering Adil Ajmal has directed software development at outfits like Intuit and United Online.

Twitter did say that Posterous would remain up and running without interruption. However, hosting outfit eNom will now manage custom Posterous domains.

Neither Posterous nor Twitter could immediately be reached for comment.

Article source: http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2012/03/twitter-posterous/

Shooting on 17th hole of Golf Course wounds golfer

A shooting on the Canyon Lake Golf Course (Hole 17) on Sunday, March 11, about 5:45 p.m., resulted in what police are calling a “superficial wound” in the left forearm of resident Scot Wade. However, it doesn’t feel very superficial to Scot, who provided pictures and said doctors decided to leave the bullet (or pellet) in his arm rather than remove it.

The official press release from Lt. Paul Bennett said, in part, “On Sunday, March 11, 2012, at 5:45 p.m., Canyon Lake Police received a call of four subjects carrying rifles in the tree line adjacent to the Golf Course near the 17th hole. Shortly thereafter, a male adult golfer reported being struck in the forearm by an unknown object.”

Scot says he was golfing with his 12-year-old son, Scotty, and friends, Nick Collura and Matt Gerken, Sunday afternoon when he suddenly felt an exploding pain in his hand at the same time he heard a loud noise. He at first thought he and his golf club had been struck by lightning, but the sky was clear. He then thought he had been hit by someone else’s ball. Then he saw the hole in his arm at the same time his brain briefly recorded movement beyond the fence line adjacent to the hole.

Nick says he and Matt heard the shot at the same time Scot was chipping the ball and couldn’t understand why the shot sounded so loud. After they saw the hole in his arm, they rushed to the fence line to see if they could detect the shooter.

By then, Scot and Scotty had jumped in their golf cart and were driving the one-minute distance to the clubhouse; Nick and Matt quickly followed.

Scotty either called 911 or tried to call 911, but by the time they reached the clubhouse, Pro Shop Assistant Kyle Inman was on the phone with Riverside County Sheriffs, based on a report from the foursome right before Scot’s foursome, who allegedly told Kyle they had seen young adults walking with rifles on the golf cart path at hole 17.

When Scot walked into the clubhouse with the wound in his arm, Kyle saw it and told the police a shooting had occurred. According to Golf Pro Pat Kemball, who wasn’t at the Golf Course at the time, Kyle then provided directions to the tee box location at the top of the hill on Early Round Dr. It was Pat’s understanding that a deputy arrived but didn’t see anyone at the hole.

Back at the clubhouse, police, paramedics and an ambulance arrived almost simultaneously, Scot recalls. Scot, age 47, says his blood pressure was sky high and, since he had suffered a heart attack at the age of 37, paramedics needed to attend to his blood pressure as well as the wound.

Scot’s mother, Kathy Popa, and former wife, Gretchen Hunt, also arrived at the clubhouse. Scot was driven to the hospital by ambulance, where X-rays were taken to see if the projectile had broken a bone. Scot says the doctor showed him the X-ray on his iPhone, but didn’t say whether the projectile was a bullet or a pellet. Scot thought it looked like a bullet. They decided to leave the projectile in his arm and treat the wound with antibiotics and pain medication. Scot got home from the hospital about 10:30 p.m.

Scot says he recalls talking to a deputy assigned to the case who told him the wound would have been more severe if is was from a 22 rifle. Lt. Bennet’s press release says, “The preliminary information discovered during the investigation led officers to believe the golfer was struck by a pellet, possibly from an air-rifle.”

The press release continues, “The four subjects spotted in the woods were described as males, between the ages of 18 and 20, with one subject wearing a blue colored shirt. The subjects were gone by the time officers arrived on scene.”

Scot’s golfing partner, Nick, says he heard one of the subjects could possibly be a female. Scot’s mother, Kathy Popa, said she heard a resident by the name of Roger had also called in to report seeing people carrying guns on or near the Golf Course.

Scot naturally is alarmed by what has occurred and worries about what could have happened, especially if his son was hit. He figures the bright orange vest he was wearing provided an attractive target – beyond that he has no idea why this occurred. He says. “I don’t think I have an enemy.” His greatest worry is that whoever did it is still out there and he hopes the police take this case seriously.

The Golf Course and Country Club were closed Monday for a regular maintenance day, but Pat Kemball said he would be able to get the names of the foursome just ahead of Scot’s foursome when he gets back into the Pro Shop Tuesday. They are the ones who allegedly saw the shooters on the cart path. In the meantime, anyone with additional information regarding this incident is encouraged to contact the Canyon Lake Police Department at 951-776-1099.

Article source: http://fridayflyer.com/2012/03/09/shooting-on-17th-hole-of-golf-course-wounds-golfer

Daily News Live, Mar. 12, 2012

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Article source: http://www.philly.com/philly/video/142394165.html

Opera talks HTML5, successes, and challenges

Complete Coverage

Opera 11.5 for Mac

Ratings


  • Analysis: Royalty-free H.264 may clear way for HTML5 video standard

  • HTML5: What does it mean for you?

  • Live Update: iPhone Software 3.0

  • The original iPad: Macworld’s complete review

  • Review: Opera 11.5
  • Chrome 8

Norwegian browser maker Opera took me out to dinner last night, and we talked about what the company has been up to. In a nutshell, Opera—the only browser maker located outside the US—says it’s doing well.

The company says it has all but abandoned the strategy of getting phone makers to ship its browser on new phones. The company’s focus today is on selling its browser in emerging markets and marketing its various browsers through wireless operators.

HTML5: Dream big

The big Opera news hit last month at Mobile World Congress when the company announced its new Opera 12 browser, which contains some cool HTML5 functionality. All the browser makers—Apple (Safari), Google (Chrome), and Microsoft (Internet Explorer)—are working hard to bring new HTML5 functionality to both the desktop and to mobile devices such as phones and tablets.

Now comes the hard part of integrating HTML5 into Opera and other browsers.

The hope is that once apps that run in the browser can do everything that freestanding mobile apps (the kind you download and that run on your device) can do, the type of phone or OS you use won’t matter anymore—all apps will run on all phones. This could be huge for the app developer community, which would then focus on building one app that runs on everything. Right now, making different versions of apps for different OSes and different flavors of OSes is a huge resources sink.

The benefits would also be a boon for browser makers too, putting the browser—be it desktop or mobile—into the center of the action. Instead of download, installing, and launching apps users would spend far more time in the browser.

HTML5 hurdles: Hollywood and DRM

Opera says building its product to run HTML5 pages is no walk in the park. It’s a challenge to work within the red tape restrictions of the standards bodies and in a landscape where competitors must agree on how HTML5 should handle things such as video and touchscreen functions. But the reward of making HTML5 a new browser standard is well worth the heartache. With HTML5 pages, audio and video play within the browser (no external player required). HTML5 also delivers a cavalcade of slick interactive features ideal for the touch interface.

But it’s Hollywood, not just technical hurdles, which are proving equally thorny when it comes to development of HTML5. Hollywood wants Opera and other browsers to support a full set of DRM controls. These controls would make sure that the browser can decrypt only music or video that had been paid for, and then that the user could watch and listen to it for a prescribed amount of time. Naturally, the browser makers aren’t that excited about building this in. One Opera executive told me they want to make a browser that operates on the open Internet and can display or play any content the user decides to consume. That kind of talk sends shivers up the spine of music and movie industry types. The record and movie industries are notoriously avid (aka paranoid) about content security on the Web. They fear that delivering paid content on something as connected as a browser might make it easier to steal content.

Standards body standoff?

To add another level of complexity to the equation, issues like the above aren’t being discussed in just one standards body. There are two major ones—the World Wide Web Consortium (3WC) and the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group. The oldest and arguably most influential one, the 3WC, is known for acting very slowly, and merely “recommending” standards without having much power of enforcement. So it’s no wonder that the development world isn’t speeding toward HTML5. There’s a lot to work out, and the more I learn about the process the more it sounds like a herding cats scenario.

Article source: http://www.macworld.com/article/1165832/opera_talks_html5_successes_and_challenges.html

Netbiscuits Intros ‘Tactile’ HTML5 Framework

Netbiscuits,
a provider of solutions for building Web apps for mobile devices, has announced
Tactile, its new design and development framework that taps Web standards to
enable the creation and delivery of engaging mobile Web experiences.

Introduced at
the SXSW 2012
conference, Netbiscuits Tactile uses the Netbiscuits software as a service
(SaaS) cloud-based platform to simplify development and deployment complexities
while reducing the time and cost of publishing and maintaining
high-quality/rich user experiences for the feature-packed, gesture-driven
devices available to users today.

“As more
consumers across the globe turn to the mobile Web to search, shop, share and
connect, marketers have to create and deliver even more engaging branded
experiences in multi-device environments,” said Michael Neidhoefer, CEO of
Netbiscuits, in a statement. “We help Enterprises to do this efficiently
without compromising quality of service. Netbiscuits Tactile closes the
technical and creative gaps encountered when trying to create HTML5-based,
touch-enabled mobile Web apps that render properly no matter the device,
operating system or country in which the consumer is going mobile.”

Tactile is a cross-platform
publishing environment that combines server-side optimization, client-side
optimization, device detection, progressive enhancement and responsive design.
It uses Web standards such as HTML5 and CSS3 to help developers deliver Web
apps that can be rapidly created without wasting time and resources
compensating for browser, operating system and device fragmentation.

Moreover, for
developers and designers, Tactile identifies the specific device classes
requesting access to their content, tailors diverse multimedia content from a
server and delivers that content in formats optimized for a device’s specific
profile and screen dimensions, Netbiscuits officials said. Web apps produced
using Tactile provide end-users with a responsive and reactive experience
equivalent to those enjoyed on native applications.

Netbiscuits’
Tactile Markup replaces a large portion of JavaScript, reducing the size and
complexity of the code without compromising the user experience. Tactile also
delivers “out of the box,” cross-platform optimized display and behavior
effects and events.

In addition,
Tactile’s Device Information Services provide device characteristics from the
device and from Netbisquits databases to all touch points of a Web application—at
the edge enhancing redirection decisions, at the back-end systems allowing for
specific device-class computing and at the client side for native user
experience.

And Tactile’s
HTML5 framework also allows developers to extend the JavaScript library at all
layers—from kernel to UI components—or using CSS preprocessor capabilities.

Based on its
ability to support a range of devices and tablets, Netbiscuits was selected to
deliver a global mobile campaign for Sprite, the company said. As part of
this, Netbiscuits developed the smartphone and feature phone versions as well
as a demo tablet edition of “the Sprite Uncontainable Game” to illustrate
how functionality is developed across all screens around the globe. The
interactive program teams six NBA players, including Kobe Bryant and
LeBron James, to discover 24 amateur basketball players from around the world
who will represent either Team Sudden or Team Intense in the Sprite
Uncontainable Game during NBA All-Star 2013 in Houston, Texas. Sprite
is shining a spotlight on undiscovered basketball talent and celebrating
players’ expressive moves by participating in the Sprite Uncontainable Game as
players and fans.

Integrating
with any back-end system for all types of mobile Web sites, Netbiscuits Tactile
can be leveraged on all multi-touch devices. Developers can find a full list of
supported devices here.

The
Netbiscuits mobile platform combines rich customer experiences for mobile Websites
and apps, including sophisticated Web tools for cross-platform delivery and
optimization, an open development environment for full platform customization
and extension, and the efficiency and power of next-generation mobile
publishing via cloud computing.

Netbiscuits
also combines the flexibility and control of a development environment based on
a markup language that was made for mobile, with the convenience, scalability
and security of on-demand, cross-platform mobile delivery. This combination
provides the best of both worlds and lets developers and IT professionals focus
on innovation, without having to worry about infrastructure.

Netbiscuits
technology helps enterprises maximize the mobile opportunity by removing the
complexity of programming for many devices, enhancing their in-house and
outsourced development resources and reducing the amount of time and money it
takes to execute your mobile strategy.

In addition,
Netbiscuits delivers more than 9.6 billion pages per month and supports more
than 27,000 mobile sites and apps globally.



Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Application-Development/Netbiscuits-Intros-Tactile-HTML5-Framework-146790/

Netbiscuits Intros ‘Tactile` HTML5 Framework

Netbiscuits,
a provider of solutions for building Web apps for mobile devices, has announced
Tactile, its new design and development framework that taps Web standards to
enable the creation and delivery of engaging mobile Web experiences.

Introduced at
the SXSW 2012
conference, Netbiscuits Tactile uses the Netbiscuits software as a service
(SaaS) cloud-based platform to simplify development and deployment complexities
while reducing the time and cost of publishing and maintaining
high-quality/rich user experiences for the feature-packed, gesture-driven
devices available to users today.

“As more
consumers across the globe turn to the mobile Web to search, shop, share and
connect, marketers have to create and deliver even more engaging branded
experiences in multi-device environments,” said Michael Neidhoefer, CEO of
Netbiscuits, in a statement. “We help Enterprises to do this efficiently
without compromising quality of service. Netbiscuits Tactile closes the
technical and creative gaps encountered when trying to create HTML5-based,
touch-enabled mobile Web apps that render properly no matter the device,
operating system or country in which the consumer is going mobile.”

Tactile is a cross-platform
publishing environment that combines server-side optimization, client-side
optimization, device detection, progressive enhancement and responsive design.
It uses Web standards such as HTML5 and CSS3 to help developers deliver Web
apps that can be rapidly created without wasting time and resources
compensating for browser, operating system and device fragmentation.

Moreover, for
developers and designers, Tactile identifies the specific device classes
requesting access to their content, tailors diverse multimedia content from a
server and delivers that content in formats optimized for a device’s specific
profile and screen dimensions, Netbiscuits officials said. Web apps produced
using Tactile provide end-users with a responsive and reactive experience
equivalent to those enjoyed on native applications.

Netbiscuits’
Tactile Markup replaces a large portion of JavaScript, reducing the size and
complexity of the code without compromising the user experience. Tactile also
delivers “out of the box,” cross-platform optimized display and behavior
effects and events.

In addition,
Tactile’s Device Information Services provide device characteristics from the
device and from Netbisquits databases to all touch points of a Web application—at
the edge enhancing redirection decisions, at the back-end systems allowing for
specific device-class computing and at the client side for native user
experience.

And Tactile’s
HTML5 framework also allows developers to extend the JavaScript library at all
layers—from kernel to UI components—or using CSS preprocessor capabilities.

Based on its
ability to support a range of devices and tablets, Netbiscuits was selected to
deliver a global mobile campaign for Sprite, the company said. As part of
this, Netbiscuits developed the smartphone and feature phone versions as well
as a demo tablet edition of “the Sprite Uncontainable Game” to illustrate
how functionality is developed across all screens around the globe. The
interactive program teams six NBA players, including Kobe Bryant and
LeBron James, to discover 24 amateur basketball players from around the world
who will represent either Team Sudden or Team Intense in the Sprite
Uncontainable Game during NBA All-Star 2013 in Houston, Texas. Sprite
is shining a spotlight on undiscovered basketball talent and celebrating
players’ expressive moves by participating in the Sprite Uncontainable Game as
players and fans.

Integrating
with any back-end system for all types of mobile Web sites, Netbiscuits Tactile
can be leveraged on all multi-touch devices. Developers can find a full list of
supported devices here.

The
Netbiscuits mobile platform combines rich customer experiences for mobile Websites
and apps, including sophisticated Web tools for cross-platform delivery and
optimization, an open development environment for full platform customization
and extension, and the efficiency and power of next-generation mobile
publishing via cloud computing.

Netbiscuits
also combines the flexibility and control of a development environment based on
a markup language that was made for mobile, with the convenience, scalability
and security of on-demand, cross-platform mobile delivery. This combination
provides the best of both worlds and lets developers and IT professionals focus
on innovation, without having to worry about infrastructure.

Netbiscuits
technology helps enterprises maximize the mobile opportunity by removing the
complexity of programming for many devices, enhancing their in-house and
outsourced development resources and reducing the amount of time and money it
takes to execute your mobile strategy.

In addition,
Netbiscuits delivers more than 9.6 billion pages per month and supports more
than 27,000 mobile sites and apps globally.



Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Application-Development/Netbiscuits-Intros-Tactile-HTML5-Framework-146790/

SXSW 2012: Browser Firm Opera Talks HTML5, Successes, and Challenges

Norwegian browser maker Opera took me out to dinner last night, and we talked about what the company has been up to. In a nutshell, Opera – the only browser maker located outside the US – says it’s doing well.

The company says it has all but abandoned the strategy of getting phone makers to ship its browser on new phones. The company’s focus today is on selling its browser in emerging markets and marketing its various browsers through wireless operators.

HTML5: Dream Big

The big Opera news hit last month at Mobile World Congress when the company announced its new Opera 12 browser, which contains some cool HTML5 functionality. All the browser makers–Apple (Safari), Google (Chrome), and Microsoft (Internet Explorer) –are working hard to bring new HTML5 functionality to both the desktop and mobile devices such as phones and tablets. For a look at how well mobile browser firms are doing supporting HTML take a look at this chart from the site Mobile HTML.

Now comes the hard part of integrating HTML5 into Opera and other browsers.

The hope is that once apps that run in the browser can do everything that free standing mobile apps (the kind you download and that run on your device) can do, the type of phone or OS you use won’t matter anymore–all apps will run on all phones.

This could be huge for the app developer community, which would then focus on building one app that runs on everything. Right now, making different versions of apps for different OS’s and different flavors of OS’s is a huge resources sink.

The benefits would also be a boon for browser makers too, putting the browser – be it desktop or mobile – into the center of the action. Instead of download, installing, and launching apps users would spend far more time in the browser.

HTML5 Hurdles: Hollywood and DRM

But Opera says building its product to run HTML5 pages is no walk in the park. It says working within the red-tape-restrictions of standards bodies and in a landscape where competitors must agree on how HTML5 should handle things such as video and touchscreen functions is a challenge.

But the reward of making HTML5 a new browser standard is well worth the heartache. With HTML5 pages audio and video play within the browser (now external player required). HTML5 also delivers a cavalcade of new slick interactive features ideal for the touch interface.

But it’s Hollywood, not just technical hurdles, which are proving the equally as thorny when it comes to development of HTML5. Hollywood wants Opera and other browsers to support a full set of DRM controls. These controls would make sure the browser can decrypt only non-free music or video that had been paid for, and then that the user could watch and listen to it for a prescribed amount of time.

Naturally, the browser makers aren’t that excited about building this in. One Opera exec told me they want to make a browser that operates on the open Internet and can display or play any content the user decides to consume. That kind of talk sends shivers up the spine of music and movie industry types.

The record and movie industries are notoriously avid (A.K.A. paranoid) about content security on the Web. They fear that delivering paid content on something as connected as a browser might make it easier to steal content.

Standards Body Standoff?

And to add another level of complexity to the equation, issues like the above aren’t being discussed in just one standards body. There are two major ones–the World Wide Web Consortium (3WC) and the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group.

The oldest and arguably most influential one, the 3WC, is known for acting very slowly, and merely “recommending” standards without having much power of enforcement.

So it’s no wonder that the development world isn’t speeding toward HTML5. There’s a lot to work out, and the more I learn about the process the more it sounds like a Herding Cats scenario.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/251695/sxsw_2012_browser_firm_opera_talks_html5_successes_and_challenges.html

Ace Site Creator Makes Affiliate Marketing Easy With Use of WordPress

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California Residents Learn Vital Information About California Divorce from InCaliforniaDivorce.com

Business Management Degree Guides Helps Steer Graduates Towards Well-Paying Careers

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Best Online MBA Programs Offers Advice and Tips for Students Hoping to Earn the Advanced Degree

Shoe Club Reviews Helps Shoe-a-holics Determine Which Monthly Club Might Be Best for Them

Article source: http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/ace-site-creator-makes-affiliate-marketing-easy-with-use-of-wordpress-131236.htm

Blog To Impress With The WordPress Express Course [Deals]

Blog To Impress With The WordPress Express Course [Deals]

Mike Vardy (1:28 pm PDT, Mar 12)

Blog To Impress With The WordPress Express Course [Deals]
WordPress is one of the best contentm management systems around. Not only does it give you oodles of control on your own domain, complete with customizable theming and plugins – but it is one of the simplest ones to use out there. It’s a tool that has helped entrepreneurs, bloggers, and businesses create over 70 million websites. And you can build and create an online presence in no time flat with it.

That said, while it is easy to put toether a WordPress site getting users to come to it is a whole other ball game. That’s why having a few “insider secrets” in your bag of tricks would be a very wise move. While WordPress doesn’t involve coding a site from scratch – that’s the beauty of it – you do still need to know where to start.

The first place to start: Pick up the latest bundle from Cult of Mac Deals and get all the skills you need to build a killer WordPress site today for only $79!

That’s right…for only $79 this video course will end up saving you thousands of dollars. So if you don’t have that must-have website up and running yet, please consider it for the health of your business.
Here’s what you’ll get with this course:

Step 1: Build the Site

  • How to get a domain: 3 tricks to find great available domain names for your website and 1 cool trick to always pay less for them than anyone else
  • How to get web hosting: find affordable web hosting providers and learn your way around their admin panels
  • How to install WordPress: how to install WordPress via FTP or with 1-Click installs from your web host
  • How to make your first post: Give it a title, HTML vs Visual view
  • …and much more!

Step 2: Get Traffic!

In this step Miguel devotes 8 chapters to teach you how to get your site noticed, promoted, and loved by the world so your business can thrive!

There’s a lot more in this course, with over 51 lectures in HD Video containing over 4 hours of instruction.

Step 3: Start Building!

Now is the time to save yourself the time and frustration of researching how to use WordPress. Miguel Hernandez (that charismatic guy who founded Grumo Media) is going to teach you everything you need to know to get a website up and running in a matter of hours, and more importantly is going to show you how to attract visitors so your bank roll can stack up once your site sees daylight.

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Article source: http://www.cultofmac.com/152452/blog-to-impress-with-the-wordpress-express-course-deals/

Browser Firm Opera Talks HTML5, Successes, and Challenges

Norwegian browser maker Opera took me out to dinner last night, and we talked about what the company has been up to. In a nutshell, Opera – the only browser maker located outside the US – says it’s doing well.

The company says it has all but abandoned the strategy of getting phone makers to ship its browser on new phones. The company’s focus today is on selling its browser in emerging markets and marketing its various browsers through wireless operators.

HTML5: Dream Big

The big Opera news hit last month at Mobile World Congress when the company announced its new Opera 12 browser, which contains some cool HTML5 functionality. All the browser makers–Apple (Safari), Google (Chrome), and Microsoft (Internet Explorer) –are working hard to bring new HTML5 functionality to both the desktop and mobile devices such as phones and tablets. For a look at how well mobile browser firms are doing supporting HTML take a look at this chart from the site Mobile HTML.

Now comes the hard part of integrating HTML5 into Opera and other browsers.

The hope is that once apps that run in the browser can do everything that free standing mobile apps (the kind you download and that run on your device) can do, the type of phone or OS you use won’t matter anymore–all apps will run on all phones.

This could be huge for the app developer community, which would then focus on building one app that runs on everything. Right now, making different versions of apps for different OS’s and different flavors of OS’s is a huge resources sink.

The benefits would also be a boon for browser makers too, putting the browser – be it desktop or mobile – into the center of the action. Instead of download, installing, and launching apps users would spend far more time in the browser.

HTML5 Hurdles: Hollywood and DRM

But Opera says building its product to run HTML5 pages is no walk in the park. It says working within the red-tape-restrictions of standards bodies and in a landscape where competitors must agree on how HTML5 should handle things such as video and touchscreen functions is a challenge.

But the reward of making HTML5 a new browser standard is well worth the heartache. With HTML5 pages audio and video play within the browser (now external player required). HTML5 also delivers a cavalcade of new slick interactive features ideal for the touch interface.

But it’s Hollywood, not just technical hurdles, which are proving the equally as thorny when it comes to development of HTML5. Hollywood wants Opera and other browsers to support a full set of DRM controls. These controls would make sure the browser can decrypt only non-free music or video that had been paid for, and then that the user could watch and listen to it for a prescribed amount of time.

Naturally, the browser makers aren’t that excited about building this in. One Opera exec told me they want to make a browser that operates on the open Internet and can display or play any content the user decides to consume. That kind of talk sends shivers up the spine of music and movie industry types.

The record and movie industries are notoriously avid (A.K.A. paranoid) about content security on the Web. They fear that delivering paid content on something as connected as a browser might make it easier to steal content.

Standards Body Standoff?

And to add another level of complexity to the equation, issues like the above aren’t being discussed in just one standards body. There are two major ones–the World Wide Web Consortium (3WC) and the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group.

The oldest and arguably most influential one, the 3WC, is known for acting very slowly, and merely “recommending” standards without having much power of enforcement.

So it’s no wonder that the development world isn’t speeding toward HTML5. There’s a lot to work out, and the more I learn about the process the more it sounds like a Herding Cats scenario.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/251695/browser_firm_opera_talks_html5_successes_and_challenges.html

Positive Web Design Advertises for New Junior Web Designer

positive web design logo

Web design and development from Positive Web Design

Those interested in the role will be expected to possess sound working knowledge of a range of design platforms.

(PRWEB UK) 12 March 2012

The management team at Positive Web Design, a thriving web design and development company based in Essex, UK, have announced that they will begin advertising for a junior web designer in the next few weeks to meet demand for their ever-growing range of web solutions.

Those interested in the role will be expected to possess sound working knowledge of a range of design platforms, including Photoshop and Illustrator, as well as a strong understanding of HTML and CSS (amongst other programming codes). The existing employees at the agency are known for their efficiency and are therefore also looking for an individual with exceptional time-keeping skills and a flexible attitude towards professional web design projects of all specifications.

The web design agency has previously created hundreds of sites for clients from a variety of different industries and has seen a recent boost in enquiries and sales from a number of advertising sources. Since expanding his packages to include sought-after services such as brand creation and logo development, Peter Andrease, Lead Web Designer at Positive Web Design, has noticed a significant boom in business and is hunting for a junior web designer who can take to the helm of a number of high-profile assignments.

“Thanks to aggressive marketing campaigns we’re now in a position to take on some really interesting projects from major businesses,” Peter explains. “To do so, however, we need to employ a junior web designer with a creative mind and an obvious flair for the job. He or she will be expected to show initiative and push projects forward along with the rest of the team so that we’re able to hit our deadlines and continue to create work of such a high standard for our clients.”

Positive Web Design is a division of SEO Positive Limited. Based in Chelmsford, Essex, Positive Web Design is able to offer a wide range of web services to clients across the UK and beyond. This website design agency has extensive experience with clients from all industries and specialises in professional web design projects, so call their sales consultants today on 0800 088 6000 for more information or to obtain quotes.


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Article source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/3/prweb9275663.htm

Brief overview of responsive web design, how to test any site

1x1.trans Brief overview of responsive web design, how to test any site

Responsive web design

If you’ve been considering overhauling your company’s website, or if you’ve been to a tech conference in the last year, you’ve heard the phrase “responsive web design,” and if you’ve read other blogs, many have claimed they are “responsive” which does not mean it talks to the user, has a chat function, or allows for better communication.

No, responsive web design (RWD) implies that a web site is written with a particular coding language that (in layman’s terms) allows for a site to adapt to the device on which the site is being viewed, resizing automatically and altering navigation to suit the device rather than develop a third party app that users have to waste time downloading and forgetting to use.

The coding language lives by the theory that mobile devices come first and since mobile browsers are so limited in what they can do, design should center around that idea first, given the rise of mobile devices. When sites are not developed with W3C CSS3 (RWD), mobile browsers degrade the experience, can be slow to load, and users have to pinch the screen and pan around to zoom in and out to use the site which is not ideal, so RWD reshuffles the site automatically, knowing the size of that browser screen and making for a better browsing experience and not requiring users to download an app.

How to test any site for responsiveness

You’ve heard recently that so and so site is “responsive” and you go view it on your iPhone and get annoyed that you still have to zoom in and out, scroll all over the place, and your mobile experience is still heavy and slow.

Enter “The Responsinator” wherein you enter any URL and it will show you exactly how any website will present itself on the most common devices (iPhones, Androids, Kindle, iPad). If each size has a different layout (as pictured above), it is automatic because it is responsive, but if you see the corner of a website, it is not responsive (as pictured below). Responsinator can also help site owners and developers to see on which devices a site does not look or function properly.

1x1.trans Brief overview of responsive web design, how to test any site

Responsive web design is not yet common, and is not a coding language understood by all developers, so as a business professional, it is unrealistic to expect your designer to whip up a responsive site overnight. The biggest implication of RWD is the doing away with requiring people to download apps for a smooth experience, when they could simply experience a mobile site in their regular browser. Responsinator helps you test any site for responsiveness, especially your own, and while some industries will struggle with responsiveness because of the complex nature of what must be displayed on a site (calculators, retail search, real estate IDX), consumers will ultimately demand a more seamless mobile experience, and responsive web design is the beginning of answering that demand.

Here are some sites to test on The Responsinator to give you a feel for the difference responsiveness makes to the mobile experience (special note: RWD is very, very new, so just because a site is not yet responsive is not a reflection of the quality of the site or the company running it):

Article source: http://agbeat.com/tech-news/brief-overview-of-responsive-web-design-how-to-test-any-site/

Apple Safari Update Promises 11 Percent JavaScript Boost

Apple on Monday released an updated version of Safari that promises an 11 percent boost in JavaScript performance, among other things.

The update, Safari 5.1.4 for OS X Lion, was detailed on Apple’s support forum, and includes 10 updates and fixes.

The JavaScript boost will improve performance by up to 11 percent over Safari 5.1.3, Apple said, though performance will, of course, vary based on systems, networks, and other factors, the company was quick to point out.

Apple also promised improved responsiveness when typing in the search field after network configurations were changed or if network connections were intermittent.

Safari 5.1.4 also addresses a number of issues, Apple said, including those that: could cause webpages to flash white when switching between Safari windows; prevent the printing of U.S. Postal Service shipping labels and embedded PDFs; make Flash content appear incomplete after using gesture zooming; cause the screen to dim while watching HTML5 video; and cause some data to be left behind after pressing the “Remove All Website Data” button.

Apple said the Safari update also preserves links in PDFs saved from webpages, allows cookies set during regular browsing to be available after using Private Browsing, and improves stability, compatibility, and startup time when using extensions.

More extensive details about the update are available on Apple’s website.

Safari last made headlines in February when a Stanford University graduate student, Jonathan Mayer, released a report that accused Google and three other ad networks of side-stepping the privacy settings on Safari to track usage on iPhones and Macs without permission. Microsoft later accused Google of doing the same thing with IE.

Also last month, Apple released a developer preview of Mac OS X Mountain Lion, the next version of its operating system and a followup to last year’s Lion. For more, see PCMag’s first look at Apple OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion Developer Preview and the slideshow below.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.

For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.


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Default Desktop


Messages


Game Center


Contacts


Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2401460,00.asp

Tether an iPhone Connection? There’s an HTML5 App For That

After iTether was pulled from Apple’s App Store, the developer created an HTML5 version instead.

On Friday, Tether.com announced a new iPhone tethering app that bypasses Apple by taking the HTML5 route. The company behind the app actually developed an iOS version before switching to HTML5, but it only lasted 20 hours before Apple figured out what was going on and pulled it from the store.

“It was clear from our initial application iTether, there was enormous demand within the iPhone ecosystem,” says Tim Burke, CEO of Tether. “It was unfortunate that Apple decided to remove our application, only 20 hours after we launched. However, this caused us to innovate. Our underlying patent-pending technology behind Tether for iPhone is unlike anything on the market.”

Typically wireless carriers charge extra for tethering a smartphone’s connection to a PC or Mac, forcing subscribers to purchase a separate monthly data plan. Tethering a connection using third-party applications (and thus not paying for an extra data plan) is usually against wireless carriers’ terms and conditions. And while Tether’s HTML5 app still violates those contract rules, it doesn’t fall within reach of Apple’s Ban-hammer.

Tethering’s HTML5 app works by setting up the iPhone as a proxy server, thus the user creates an ad-hoc Wi-Fi network and then runs Tether’s desktop software to direct HTTP traffic to the iPhone. The HTML5 page loaded on the iPhone thus pushes the traffic to the Internet and returns with the resulting data, bypassing Apple and wireless network operators.

“This circumvents the need of buying the application directly from Apple’s App Store and allows any iPhone or iPad with a data connection to allow tethering,” the company reports in a blog. “Frequent travelers in particular love Tether because it works all over the world, no matter what network or carrier is available at the time. There’s no need to worry about reconfiguring the Internet connection from network to network.”

Naturally the app isn’t free even in its HTML5 form, charging users $15 for the first year and $30 for every year thereafter. The company also provides a tethering app for Android and BlackBerry, but they only require a one-time fee of $29.95 per license. “There are no additional fees, no proxy settings and it works with almost every Internet based piece of software without modification,” the FAQ reads. “Tethering with our app is the easiest solution on the market.”

Tether has been used on carriers all over the world, meaning customers can travel country to country without worrying how to set it up depending on the new carrier network they may be roaming on, the company claims.

Article source: http://www.tomsguide.com/us/iTether-tether.com-iOS-HTML5-Tim-Burke,news-14431.html

Mobilizing Web Sites

Author: Kristofer Layon
Publisher: Peachpit Press
Pages: 192
ISBN: 978-0321793812
Aimed at: Designer developers
Rating: 2
Pros: Attractive layout, readable style
Cons: Lacks technical depth
Reviewed by: Ian Elliot

The subtitle “Develop and Design” suggests this book might cover both design and technical principles. Does it fulfil this promise?

Converting a website into a mobile friendly experience is generally thought to be a difficult task. This book makes it look easy in that it doesn’t have many pages and it looks easy to read.  It is part of a series aimed at “designer developers” which seems like a great idea – let’s get designers up to speed with the technology.

 

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However when you get to Chapter 1 you start to wonder if the book is going to deliver on anything technical at all. The chapter is full of headings such as “devices aren’t mobile – people are” which sound good but are not going to get your CSS sorted out. The chapter discusses the philosophy of a mobile experience and closes with a short introduction to the Kano model of customer satisfaction.

Chapter 2 is a little more technical in that it considers the requirements of a mobile layout. This starts off considering fixed versus variable width layout. This is interesting, but basically comes down to “use a variable width layout that will adjust to a smaller screen automatically”.  Of course, it makes use of the CSS media element to scale the screen so at least we are creating some CSS.

From here we move on to the first of the three interviews contained in the book. If you find this sort of thing useful then it will be a plus point – personally I just found it irritating.

Chapter 3 takes up the challenge of creating mobile sites again with a look at navigation. After some design waffle we get to scaling a menu and making it look as if has buttons. Chapter 4 is about images and basically about sizing. However, page 69 has some vendor prefixes to create a grid layout. No discussion of how to cope with vendor prefixes is provided.  Chapter 5 deals with text and starts with an argument about how to measure the size of text by points or by ems.

Chapter 6 discusses the use of forms but only from the point of view of how they look – noting about validation or working with code. Chapter 7 is on social media. chapter 8 is on content strategy and both are very waffly.

Chapter 9 is a very non-technical look at how jQuery mobile might help and Chapter 10 tackles an even more technical subject – device detection and php – in a way that is so non-technical that it makes you wonder why the chapter is included.

If you want a more or less non-technical approach to mobile site design then you might like this book. It does have some CSS and some HTML but nothing very deep or amazing. It does have lots of discussion about what good mobile design is and for this reason you might want to read it but I doubt you will want to read it to discover how to actually create a mobile site – it just isn’t technical or deep enough. It very certainly doesn’t cover any of the complexities of working with anything other than iOS and Android and it doesn’t go into taking advantage of the new features of HTML5 – but to be fair it doesn’t claim to be about new technologies. The back jacket blurb does say however “you can use HTML, CSS and JavaScript” and there is very little JavaScript in the book and, given its subject matter, not much HTML/CSS either.

The problem with finding an audience for this book is that it is probably too technical for a pure designer and not technical enough if you can program. It isn’t really suitable for the beginner because it doesn’t explain the first principles of HTML/CSS and it certainly isn’t suitable for the expert because it doesn’t go anywhere.

So if you fall into a tiny band of people who have just enough knowledge of the technicalities, want to concentrate on design and perhaps practice a few lines of CSS to achieve your results, you might get something from reading it. If you are even slightly technical you will find it too shallow.

 

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Article source: http://www.i-programmer.info/bookreviews/12-web-design-and-development-/3915-mobilizing-web-sites.html

Obama Health-Care Foe Clement Becomes Republicans’ Go-To Lawyer

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Paul Clement

Paul Clement

Paul Clement

Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Paul Clement, counsel for the National Rifle Association, right, and Wayne LaPierre, Executive Vice President of the NRA, outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 28, 2010.

Paul Clement, counsel for the National Rifle Association, right, and Wayne LaPierre, Executive Vice President of the NRA, outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 28, 2010. Photographer: Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images


Enlarge image
Paul Clement

Paul Clement

Paul Clement

Paul Clement, partner at Bancroft PLLC and former solicitor general of the United States, poses for a portrait in Washington. In the Supreme Court’s current nine-month term, Clement is arguing seven cases, the most by a private lawyer in a single term since at least the 1970′s. Photo: Christopher Powers/Bloomberg

Paul Clement, partner at Bancroft PLLC and former solicitor general of the United States, poses for a portrait in Washington. In the Supreme Court’s current nine-month term, Clement is arguing seven cases, the most by a private lawyer in a single term since at least the 1970′s. Photo: Christopher Powers/Bloomberg

Paul Clement is poised to make a
deeper imprint on American law this year than anyone without the
title “justice.”

Clement, the 45-year-old attorney at the forefront of the
U.S. Supreme Court challenge to President Barack Obama’s health-
care plan, has become the go-to lawyer for conservatives on the
country’s highest-profile legal fights.

He is making the Republican case against the Obama
administration on illegal immigration, voter-identification
laws, gay marriage and recess appointments, as well as health
care. In January, he won a high court victory for Texas (BEESTX)
Republicans on congressional redistricting.

“For any case before the Supreme Court, Paul Clement has
to be option A,” said Greg Abbott, the Republican Texas
attorney general who hired Clement to argue the redistricting
case and whose state is one of 26 challenging the health-care
law. “Paul Clement is the preeminent lawyer in the country,
especially when it comes to Supreme Court advocacy.”

In the court’s current nine-month term, Clement is arguing
seven cases, the most by a private lawyer in a single term since
at least the 1970s. His biggest fight is the challenge to the
2010 health-care overhaul, the first time the high court has
considered a president’s signature legislative victory during
his re-election campaign.

Clement disclaims any ideological agenda. From his downtown
Washington office last month, the Wisconsin native described
himself as a lawyer driven by the challenge of arguing difficult
cases, rather than a desire to reshape the law.

‘Political Lens’

“I’m not going to deny being a Republican, but I don’t
think that really dictates what kind of cases I’m interested in
taking,” the blue-eyed Clement said, sipping tea in the
conference room of his law firm, Bancroft PLLC, as his gold-
rimmed glasses slipped down his nose. “I really don’t look at
cases through a political lens.”

He can point to his list of cases as evidence. Clement has
represented two wrongfully convicted men seeking to sue
prosecutors and argued in favor of forcing California to reduce
overcrowding in its prisons. The National Law Journal looked at
his caseload before the court’s 2009-10 term and said in a
headline that Clement “embraces liberal clients.”

Even so, his current caseload could be a Republican wish
list, starting with the health-care case scheduled for arguments
March 26-28. Clement will be arguing alongside two lawyers
representing a business trade group opposed to the law and
against U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli, the Obama
administration’s top courtroom lawyer.

Arizona Crackdown

The following month, Clement will try to persuade the nine
justices to uphold Arizona’s illegal-immigration crackdown,
which the Obama administration is challenging.

For some liberals, Clement has become the face of legal
peril.

“He is a man who seems to have decided that he’s going to
devote his career to being the most skilled hired gun for people
who want to ruin the Constitution,” said Ian Millhiser, a
policy analyst at the Center for American Progress Action Fund,
an advocacy group in Washington founded by a Democrat.

That view isn’t universal among Democrats. Justice Elena Kagan, an Obama appointee, praised Clement at a reception last
year just after his resignation from the law firm King
Spalding (1140L)
. Clement stepped down after the firm dropped another of
his high-profile clients — congressional Republicans supporting
a federal law defining marriage as being between one man and one
woman.

Clement’s Ability

What’s not in dispute is Clement’s ability as a Supreme
Court lawyer. His resume alone puts him in the legal elite. He
worked alongside Obama on the Harvard Law Review, had a
clerkship with Justice Antonin Scalia and served as President
George W. Bush’s top Supreme Court lawyer.

In the courtroom, he argues with a combination of
politeness and doggedness.

“He can handle any topic and he’s as likable as they
come,” said Lisa Blatt, who heads the appellate and Supreme
Court practice at Arnold Porter LLP (1150L) in Washington. “He really
enjoys it up there, and you can see it.”

Clement’s rapport with the justices is similarly easy to
see.

In 2008, while Clement was arguing for limits on civil
rights suits, Scalia mentioned the “bad old days” when the
Supreme Court was quick to rule that people could sue to enforce
federal statutes. Momentarily confused about which previous case
they were discussing, Scalia asked his former clerk when he
thought the “bad old days” ended.

Drawing Laughter

“The bad old days ended when you got on the court, Justice
Scalia,” Clement answered, drawing laughter from the audience.

The line worked, Clement said later, less because it drew
laughs than because it reinforced his argument that the court’s
more recent precedents supported his side of the case.

“Humor for its own sake I don’t think works” in Supreme
Court arguments, Clement said.

It’s not always smooth going. When Clement last month
represented Indianapolis in a dispute about suits over tax-law
changes, he repeatedly clashed with Chief Justice John Roberts
and Justice Samuel Alito. Roberts even showed a flash of
irritation when Clement corrected the chief justice by saying
Indianapolis might have to pay $3 million in refunds, rather
than the $2.7 million Roberts had suggested.

“OK, $3 million,” Roberts said with an exaggerated smile.

Trust and Success

Still, the justices “like him and trust him,” said Blatt,
who worked for Clement when he was solicitor general. “I don’t
think it’s a surprise he’s as successful as he is.”

His success rate is hard to measure, given the court’s
penchant for issuing mixed decisions, and Clement said he
doesn’t tally wins and losses. In perhaps his biggest victory as
a private lawyer, he represented the National Rifle Association
in 2010 and secured a ruling that said states and cities, like
the federal government, must respect gun rights.

In addition to his seven Supreme Court cases, Clement has a
full docket that may eventually land at the nation’s top court.
Clement is helping defend South Carolina’s voter-identification
law against Justice Department claims that it discriminates
against racial minorities.

He is urging limits on the president’s power to make
appointments during congressional recesses, arguing in a case in
federal court in New York that Obama improperly appointed three
new members to the National Labor Relations Board.

‘Enormous’ Pressure

“I don’t know of anybody else who could to it,” said
Theodore Olson, a Gibson Dunn Crutcher LLP (1128L) partner who
preceded Clement as Bush’s solicitor general, serving from 2001
to 2004 with Clement as his chief deputy. “It’s a tremendous
amount of work and an enormous amount of pressure.”

Not all of Clement’s cases are political. He represented
National Football League owners during last year’s player
lockout. In three of his seven Supreme Court cases this term,
his clients are businesses.

Olson likens Clement to Roberts, who was a top Supreme
Court lawyer before Bush appointed him to the bench. Many
observers say the next Republican president might extend that
parallel and appoint Clement to the Supreme Court alongside
Roberts.

“It’d be insane not to consider him,” said Neal Katyal,
who served as Obama’s acting solicitor general and is now a
partner at Hogan Lovells US LLP (1131L). “He’s super-smart. He
understands every lawyer’s trick in the book. Like the current
chief justice, he can see through a lot of stuff and I think
that’s an incredibly powerful trait for a justice.”

Tree-Lined Street

Clement lives with his wife, Alexandra, and three sons on a
tree-lined street in the Washington suburb of Alexandria,
Virginia. They own a two-story, $2.3 million house built in
1769, according to property records.

The son of a company chief financial officer and a
homemaker, Clement grew up in the Milwaukee suburb of Cedarburg,
Wisconsin. The youngest of four children, he had to work hard to
weigh in during lively dinner-table conversations.

“That’s where I probably started honing some of my
debating skills,” he said in an interview at his Washington
law firm, Bancroft PLLC.

He was conservative enough as an undergraduate student at
Georgetown University that he interned for a Republican U.S.
senator, Bob Kasten of Wisconsin, and in President Ronald Reagan’s White House. After earning a master’s degree in
economics at Cambridge University, he followed the path of his
older brother by choosing law school over a PhD in economics.

Across Ideological Lines

Clement argued 49 Supreme Court cases in the solicitor
general’s office from 2001 to 2008, more than anyone else during
that period, making arguments that cut across ideological lines.
He served as Bush’s lead courtroom lawyer on terrorism issues
and defended the 2002 McCain-Feingold campaign finance law.

A 2004 terrorism case, involving a U.S. citizen held in a
military brig in South Carolina, produced a rare low moment for
Clement after he assured the justices that the U.S. didn’t
torture prisoners. Later the same day, the television show “60
Minutes II” aired the first photos of U.S. soldiers abusing
inmates at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

“Like everyone else, I was shocked by the photos, but I
was also angry,” Clement said later. Had he known about the
photos in advance, he could have put them in a legal context for
the court, he said. “I was deprived of that opportunity to do
the lawyer’s job.”

Dispute With Firm

When Clement returned to private practice in 2008, he chose
King Spalding, an Atlanta-based firm where he had previously
worked. The relationship disintegrated suddenly last April when
the firm came under pressure to withdraw from the marriage case.

Unwilling to drop a client, Clement sought advice from an
old Harvard Law School friend, Viet Dinh, who had recently
started his own firm, Bancroft. Within days, Clement decided to
leave King Spalding and join Bancroft, bringing the health-
care and marriage cases along with him.

In his resignation letter, Clement wrote that “the surest
way to be on the wrong side of history is to abandon a client in
the face of hostile criticism.”

Bancroft carries a Republican tint. The three partners –
Clement, Dinh and Christopher Bartolomucci — are all veterans
of the Bush administration. Five other lawyers at the firm
clerked for either Roberts or Alito, Bush’s two appointees to
the court.

Clement’s Bills

The firm charges as much as $1,020 an hour for Clement’s
services, according to court records. His rate will be lower in
the health-care case because his contract with the states caps
fees at $250,000.

Though tiny by Washington standards, the 13-lawyer firm is
quickly running out of space to accommodate the lawyers hired to
work on Clement’s cases. Clement himself has a makeshift office,
separated from Dinh by a glass wall that splits what used to be
an exclusive corner office.

Clement’s side of the room is full of clutter. Stacks of
paper bury his coffee table, while used mugs and water bottles -
- 10 of them on one afternoon last month — overtake his desk.

The behind-the-scenes mess is at odds with the crispness
both sides expect from him when he argues what may prove to be
the biggest case of his career.

“It’s a great thing that he’s doing the health care
argument,” said Katyal, who argued against Clement on health
care at the appeals court level. “That side of the case needs
to be represented by the best advocate possible, and that’s
Paul.”

To contact the reporter on this story:
Greg Stohr in Washington at
gstohr@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Steven Komarow at
skomarow1@bloomberg.net

Article source: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-03-12/obama-health-care-foe-clement-becomes-republicans-go-to-lawyer.html

iTether Skirts App Store Ban With HTML5 App

Wireless network operators want you to pay extra to tether a laptop to your smartphone. An iOS app called iTether allowed iPhone and iPad owners to tether without paying those extra carrier fees. That’s probably why Apple yanked iTether’s iPhone application a mere 20 hours after it landed in the App Store on November 29.

Now, iTether is back.

Rather than rewrite their app to conform to Apple’s rules, the team decided to take an entirely different approach. Tether created an HTML5 Web app that uses an ad-hoc setup to let iPhone users tether their PC to their smartphone.

This circumvents the need to buy the application directly from Apple’s App Store and allows any iPhone or iPad with a data connection to tether successfully–without paying those extra monthly fees to the carrier.

[ Tethering workarounds keep popping up. Read iPhone App Contains Secret Tethering Capability. ]

“It was clear from our initial application iTether, there was enormous demand within the iPhone ecosystem,” said Tim Burke, CEO of Tether in a blog post. “It was unfortunate that Apple decided to remove our application, only 20 hours after we launched. However, this caused us to innovate. Our underlying patent-pending technology behind Tether for iPhone is unlike anything on the market.”

Tether says that its HTML5 iPhone app works across carriers and networks, and won’t require users to reconfigure every time they use the application with a new network or new device.

Right now, the service is available at a promotional price of just $15 per year, though that price is set to double to $30 per year in the coming weeks.

Is using this service a good idea? Well, that really depends.

For the record, I pay ATT $25 per month for 2GB of smartphone data and another $20 per month for 2GB of tethering data. That’s $45 per month for 4GB of data. I chew through between 1.2GB and 1.7GB on my smartphone (app downloads, email, photo/video uploads, etc.) every month. The amount of data I use just for tethering varies widely from a few hundred megabytes to more than 1GB. Though I am not using my full 4GB allotment, I use my iPhone as a mobile hotspot without fail every single month, and this feature has saved my behind a few times when every other type of connection failed.

Wireless network operators, including ATT, were able to figure out when customers were tethering their smartphones without subscribing. They issued cease-and-desist letters and demanded that customers pay up or else.

That extra $20 per month hurts. It adds up to $480 over the lifetime of my contract with ATT. I’d rather spend that $480 on pretty much anything else. iTether lets you avoid that $20 monthly tethering/hot spot fee–though you’re probably violating the terms of your contract in some way. The question is, are you willing to take the chance? Will ATT and other carriers figure out how to block this and then pursue action against their customers? Will Apple and its carrier partners pursue legal action against iTether? It’s possible.

Bottom line: If you’re a mobile professional and require reliable and easy-to-use mobile broadband when on the road, your employer should be willing to pay for it.

Here’s a video that demonstrates how iTether for the iPhone works:

InformationWeek is conducting a survey to determine the types of measures and policies IT is taking to ensure the security of the full range of mobile assets on cellular, Wi-Fi, and other wireless technologies. Upon completion of our survey, you will be eligible to enter a drawing to receive an 32-GB Apple iPod Touch. Take our Mobile Security Survey now. Survey ends March 16.

Article source: http://www.informationweek.com/news/mobility/smart_phones/232602412

Trigger.io Expands Its HTML5 Development Framework With New "Build-to-Web" Option

Trigger’s recently launched Forge framework now provides web developers with the simplest way to build for both mobile and web; First to Enable HTML5 Deployment for Native Mobile, Mobile Web and Web Apps From a Single Codebase

San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) March 12, 2012

Trigger.io today announced it has expanded its recently launched cross-platform development framework with a new ‘Build-to-Web’ option. This option enables web developers to create and deploy web apps in addition to native mobile apps – all from a single HTML5 codebase. With Trigger.io’s Forge framework, developers only need to write their code once in HTML5 and use the service’s simple JavaScript API to access native device features and make cross-domain requests. They can then release native mobile apps in the App Store or Android Marketplace, and deploy their web app to Heroku, Trigger.io’s first hosting partner.

“Companies are using the mobile channel to access new customers and increase engagement with existing ones. Web developers are quickly discovering how important it is to provide a cohesive native mobile and mobile web experience,” said Trigger.io co-founder and CEO Amir Nathoo. “With our new ‘Build-to-web’ option, Trigger.io’s Forge framework simplifies the development process for anyone who wants to target both web and mobile apps. Now, web developers don’t have to write multiple codebases using separate platforms and tools. Forge helps developers create a combined mobile and web strategy using just one framework and codebase.”

Trigger.io’s framework, called Forge, stays out of the way while web developers create their applications in familiar web technologies – HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Developers can then use the tools at https://trigger.io/forge to build the app as native with offline access and native features, and as a web app. Using Forge, developers can take advantage of HTML5 power and ease, while hosting a full native feature set – including notifications, camera and file access, and full cross-domain access to enable secure transactions. Trigger.io’s debug tool, called Catalyst, can then be used to provide a Webkit-style debugger for all platforms.

Trigger.io’s framework suits web developers new to mobile app development and provides the fastest development process and native bridge available in the market. Web developers looking to crack into the revenue opportunities from mobile – including native and mobile web, can continue working with open web standards and familiar languages while using Trigger.io. Also, unlimited support on all subscription plans means that developers new to mobile can get the help they need to get great results.

About Trigger.io

Trigger.io is the simplest way to build for both mobile and web. Its cross-platform development framework let’s developers create web apps and native mobile apps from the same HTML5 codebase and has been optimized for web developers new to mobile app development.

Trigger.io raised $1M in a seed round of funding in 2010 from several high-profile investors including Paul Graham, SV Angel, 500 Startups, Russ Siegelman, Steven Walske, RightVentures, Venture51 and John Taysom. For more, please visit https://trigger.io

Amir Nathoo
Trigger.io
415.602.7325
Email Information

Article source: http://news.yahoo.com/trigger-io-expands-html5-development-framework-build-option-170023802.html

appMobi Launches jqMobi 1.0 HTML5 Mobile App Framework

appMobi has
announced the release of jqMobi 1.0, the initial generally available
version of its new open-source HTML5 mobile framework for building apps for
mobile devices.

appMobi
originally created and open sourced jqMobi to remedy the poor cross-platform
performance of JavaScript frameworks on iOS and Android, the company said.
Frameworks like jqMobi speed the development of HTML5-based mobile apps that
are deployed as Web apps or as hybrid iOS and Android apps created using
appMobi or PhoneGap/Cordova.

The jqMobi
HTML5 mobile framework includes three functional libraries:

  • jqMobi,
    a blazingly fast query selector library with jQuery-compatible syntax;

  • jqUI,
    a touch-based user interface library for WebKit browsers that handles
    headers, footers, transitions, scrolling lists, transitions, forms,
    carousels and Android bug fixes;and

  • jqPlugins,
    a jQuery-compatible plug-in manager for WebKit browsers.
  • “”

As a proponent
of the open mobile Web, appMobi has developed tools and cloud-based services
built on HTML5, CSS and JavaScript, creating a unified, open ecosystem that
competes favorably with “walled gardens” offered by Apple and Google. In 2011,
the company released several of its core technologies as open source, including
its cross-platform mobile device API, mobiUs Web browser, the jqMobi app
framework and directCanvas HTML5 game acceleration.

The 1.0
release of jqMobi includes numerous improvements, bug fixes and tablet
enhancements that have been contributed by the open-source community. At its
original launch in January, jqMobi had only 30 API functions and basic event
support. The 1.0 release features more than 60 API calls, expanded event
support and query selector compatibility, along with many bug fixes. jqUI now
has six color themes to choose from, vector-based iconography and it works
seamlessly on tablets. jqUI is still very small, only 21K bits minified and
gZipped. Additionally, jqMobi 1.0 is still just as fast as the beta version and
only slightly larger, at 5K bits minified and gZipped.

Initially
launched as open source on January 16, jqMobi has been rapidly embraced by the
mobile HTML5 development community, with more than 10,000 downloads, 80 “forks”
and more than 500 watchers on its GitHub repository.

“jqMobi could
not have been released at a better time,” said Michael Bryne, a developer at
Fueled Media, a Web design firm, in a statement. “As my first foray into mobile
application development, jqMobi allowed me to get my app up and running in
record time, with a full feature set and rock-solid one-of-a-kind support from
the development team. I cannot recommend jqMobi and jqUI enough.”

appMobi
officials said most JavaScript app frameworks deliver a good user experience on
iOS devices, yet many have difficulties with the highly fragmented Android
platform. However, jqMobi offers developers a solid framework that delivers
equivalent user experience on iOS and Android platforms. In terms of numbers,
the Android platform dominates the mobile industry, with 850,000 new devices
being authorized per day. appMobi claims.

jqMobi 1.0 is
available immediately as a free download at www.jqMobi.com.

In November
2011, appMobi open-sourced some of its core HTML5 technology. appMobi announced
on Black Friday, November 25, that it would open-source key elements of its
mobile technology to further accelerate the industry’s migration to HTML5. The
open-sourced technology included the appMobi cross-platform device APIs, which
support HTML5 development for both Android and iOS platforms. appMobi also
released the source code for its “mobiUs” browser, which allows HTML5 Web apps
to perform identically to native apps. And appMobi rounded out the bounty of
technology made available to HTML5 developers with its “DirectCanvas”
technology, which accelerates HTML5 canvas rendering, physics calculations and
sound by as much as 1,500 percent, providing native performance to HTML5-based
games.

“We believe in
the open Web and the importance of an open environment for mobile apps and
services,” said appMobi CTO Sam Abadir in a statement. “To help advance the industry’s
move from native apps to Web-based apps, we are sharing our mobile HTML5
knowledge with the global software development community. Among other benefits,
the innovations in this open-source release will improve the mobile Web
experience through faster downloads, better offline usage and dramatic HTML5
game performance increases. An improved HTML5 user experience is the ‘rising
tide that lifts all ships’ for open Web mobile developers, and we are happy to
pour our technology into that harbor.”

 

 



Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Application-Development/appMobi-Launches-jqMobi-10-HTML5-Mobile-App-Framework-541962/